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Careers for History Graduates

January 12, 2013

You have a degree in history, congratulations! But, what is the next step? What careers can be followed using that degree you have worked so hard to get? I have been asking myself these questions and I will share with you the answers I have come up with. Here are my 5 top careers for history students.

1. Academia

A choice for many subjects really, if you truly enjoy the research and can do a bit of teaching then this might be for you. If you survive the PhD, you could continue on, become a specialist in your chosen field and teach it as well. It’s not for me, but it might be for you.

2. Teaching

Even if you go all the way in your studies and complete a PhD, you can still teach at a primary or secondary level. I have done some experience in all ages at schools and I love teaching the latter end of the primary schools. This is certainly something I would consider doing after my PhD and something for others to consider as well.

3. Publishing

After a degree, you have a lot of reading under your belt. You will also have good time management and research skills leaving you in an ideal position for a career in publishing. Expect an entry-level job, but you may in time do quite well. If you want to go into publishing, getting some work experience is a must.

4. Journalism

Having written numerous essays, researching and writing should be fairly natural to a student of history. If current affairs are of interest to you and you enjoy the writing, then journalism could be for you. There must be a wide range of areas in which work can be found related to journalism. I’m guessing experience would be helpful, but as this is an area that I haven’t been drawn to I can’t say for sure.

5. Museums

I can’t really think of a good enough title for this career path because there are quite a few directions that can be taken when working in a museum. This is something I am particularly interested in; there are two areas I like the look of. The first is curatorial and the second is education. Unfortunately, due to the dreaded funding cuts, jobs are incredibly hard to come by. Work experience is essential, but equally difficult to come by.

These five career paths are only the beginning of the possibilities for history and indeed other arts graduates. Hopefully it will give some people some inspiration for what life will be like after the degree is over.

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